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CDs are no more, they have ceased to be...

The real day was a long time ago, when finally we all realized the physical CD serves no purpose whatsoever. How about the art, the booklet, you may ask? Turns out you leaf through them the first time, rip the CD into iTunes and never look at it again. And then you end up with a huge pile of plastic that takes valuable space in your house. With the convenience of iTunes, Amazon's MP3 store, and others, there's no longer any reason to have physical CDs, unless of course, some retrograde music industry executive or group forces your hand. As Rolling Stone pointed out, the Beatles Remastered 2009 CD set is probably the last physical CD you'll ever buy. It was for me.

[caption id="attachment_104" align="alignnone" width="640" caption="CDs prepare for their new life in storage"]CDs in Storage Boxes[/caption]

So, today was the day to run through all those CDs and put them into boxes, by category, sorted within each category. That was fun! The process resulted in a large pile of CDs not even worthy of their new backup-in-the-basement role. Some can probably be given away, most others will end up in the garbage.

Another side effect of this epic development: removing from our 18 year old stereo any component that is not directly involved with playing music from iTunes via AirTunes. That is, the tape deck and the CD player carrousel are Gone, Gone, Gone. Only the amplifier, speakers and connection to AirTunes remain. The cabinet that hosted all those components is now too big and will soon go meet them wherever it is these obsolete but noble devices end up.

It's all part of the trend shared with eBooks: more and more annoyance at the environmental impact of having to produce these physical items.

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